The Honourable Sandra Chapnik appointed distinguished visiting professor at Ryerson University

The Honourable Sandra Chapnik, former judge of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, has been appointed distinguished visiting professor. Reporting to the provost and vice-president, academic, she will act as a resource on the university’s application for a Juris Doctor program, provide guest lectures, and represent Ryerson to the broader community.

Chapnik entered law school in 1973 as part of the first class of mature students at Osgoode Hall Law School. She obtained an LLB degree and was called to the Ontario Bar in 1978. In the field, she practiced in the areas of civil litigation, family and entertainment law. In 1991, she was appointed a judge of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice and she retired from the bench in 2016.

It is my great honour to welcome the Honourable Sandra Chapnik to Ryerson’s academic community – we are privileged to have her act as a resource and advocate for the university’s application of a Juris Doctor program,” said Michael Benarroch, provost and vice-president, academic. “Students in Criminology and Business will also have the opportunity to attend a guest lecture with Sandra in the fall and winter terms of the 2017-18 academic year.”

Prior to her judicial career, Chapnik was appointed to several governmental tribunals as an adjudicator, including the Rent Review Commission, the Education Relations Commission, the Worker’s Compensation Appeals Tribunal, and later, the Pension Appeals Board of Canada. She also took an active role in the governance and administration of law in Ontario, serving as an executive member of the Canadian and Ontario Bar Associations, president of the Women’s Law Association, a bar admission course instructor, president of the Osgoode Hall Law School Alumni Association, and a bencher of the Law Society of Ontario. In these capacities, Chapnik helped establish priorities and initiatives to move these organizations forward, including the development of comprehensive reports on co-operative legal education in Ontario law schools, mandatory drug testing in the workplace and Osgoode Hall Law School’s mature student program.

Chapnik’s contributions to the legal and broader community reflect her special interests in women’s and human rights, access to justice and education. For example, she helped organize and plan two conferences for lawyers and judges titled Combating Hatred in the 21st Century, a first of its kind. She also established a bursary at Osgoode Hall Law School for mature students in need of financial assistance and a Women-Law Award for women who have entered law school after having been out in the workforce. Her volunteer and charity work focuses on social justice issues and on providing education for young persons from various disadvantaged backgrounds and countries.

“Education is one of my passions. Before attending law school, I was a teacher, and it’s exciting to re-enter academia after many years in the judicial system,” said Chapnik. “This appointment is an incredible opportunity to help Ryerson develop a new type of law school; one that focuses on innovation, entrepreneurship and community.”

In recognition of her many accomplishments and contributions to the public service, Chapnik has been the recipient of awards and honours given by the Canadian Bar Association, the Women’s Law Association of Ontario, Osgoode Hall Law School, and several charities. She also received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal and a Reuben Wells Leonard Scholarship from the University of Toronto.

Fairly Equal: Lawyering the Feminist Revolution by Linda Silver Dranoff

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Fairly Equal: Lawyering the Feminist Revolution

24.95

By Linda Silver Dranoff

 

An eyewitness account of the revolution in women’s rights under the law.

Lawyer, activist, and former Chatelaine legal columnist Linda Silver Dranoff details her own trailblazing journey from a traditional 1950s childhood to the battlegrounds of the courts of law and the halls of power where she and a generation of women lawyers, supporting a larger feminist movement, championed the rights of Canadian women and families.

Through a combination of memoir and social history, Dranoff brings to life the struggles around family law, pay and employment equity, violence against women, abortion rights, childcare, pension rights, political engagement, public policy, and access to legal justice. From backroom battles to public and private protest, the stories are inspiring.

Fairly Equal reminds us of the importance of remaining vigilant about our rights. Knowing what Dranoff’s generation of women lawyers and activists achieved, and how easily it can be taken away, we are encouraged in sisterhood and solidarity to ensure that the many hard-won gains of the feminist movement are maintained and expanded for the women who follow.

A Feminist History Society Book

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The Osgoode First Generation Network

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Dear Women’s Law Association of Ontario,

 

Thank you for your support toward the Osgoode & UTLaw First Generation Networks and for considering the following request.

 

The Osgoode First Generation Network was created in December 2015 with the aim of reducing the professional, social and financial barriers to law school faced by students who are the first in their family to attend post-secondary education. The Network expanded to UTLaw in September 2016. The Network has a strong focus on activities that involve members of the legal community who were also the first in their family to attend post-secondary education. This year we launched a professional mentorship program for our student members and are planning two large events to be held at Toronto-based law firms in Spring 2017.

As the support of first generation legal professionals is so integral to our success, we are looking to grow our list and seek out more individuals who fall into this category. We have had the support of many Bay Street firms and the Ministry of the Attorney General in distributing our Call for Participation, but we feel that we are missing several members of the legal community, including: sole practitioners, in-house lawyers, judges, lawyers specializing in non-corporate areas of law and more.

In order to expand our list of first generation lawyers, we are hoping that the Women’s Law Association of Ontario may be willing to distribute our Call for Participation to your membership list, and/or promote the Call for Participation through any available channels (website, social media, etc.). The Call for Participation includes instructions on how interested individuals can join our network. Once new members join, they will be added to our e-mail list where they will receive a monthly newsletter, and invitations to participate in our programs and events.

Thank you for your support toward this initiative and for considering this request. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

Warmest Regards,

Brooke Longhurst

Osgoode & UTLaw First Generation Network Founder

University of Toronto, JD Student, Class of 2018

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A fantastic turnout to the November 24, 2016 Holiday Event with Keynote speaker The Honourable Patty Hajdu

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The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Status of Women, gave an inspiring keynote address at our annual seasonal dinner on November 24th. Minister Hajdu, well known and well respected within her community for her work on substance use issues, harm reduction, housing, and public health, spoke of the current projects underway within her portfolio, everything from strategies for working toward elimination of gender based violence, to diversity, pay equity, Person's Day, and the historic and evolving roles of women in Canada. Our thanks to Minister Hajdu for taking the opportunity to spend time with WLAO members and guests.

We also heard from the Honourable Julie Dabrusin, Member of Parliament for Toronto-Danforth, whose volunteer efforts won Julie the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for Community Service in 2013. Julie provided an entertaining and thoughtful overview of her constituency concerns before taking a moment to introduce Minister Hajdu.

A beautiful evening of camaraderie, thoughtful discussion, delicious food, and a lovely venue; thanks to all who attended!

 

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Judicial Advisory Committees - seeking applicants - closing November 17, 2016 5:00pm

Judicial Advisory Committees

Three positions open as Representatives of the General Public on the Committees (volunteer).

For more information visit http://www.fja-cmf.gc.ca/appointments-nominations/committees-comites/index-eng.html.

Independent judicial advisory committees constitute the heart of the appointments process. It is the committees who have the responsibility of assessing the qualifications for appointment of the lawyers who apply. There is at least one committee in each province and territory; because of their larger population, Ontario has three regionally based committees and Quebec has two. Candidates are assessed by the regional committee established for the judicial district of their practice or occupation, or by the committee judged most appropriate by the Commissioner. Each committee consists of eight members representing the bench, the bar, law enforcement associations and the general public:

  • a nominee of the provincial or territorial law society;
  • a nominee of the provincial or territorial branch of the Canadian Bar Association;
  • a judge nominated by the Chief Justice of the province or by the senior judge of the territory;
  • a nominee of the provincial Attorney General or territorial Minister of Justice;
  • a nominee of the law enforcement community; and
  • 3 nominees of the federal Minister of Justice representing the general public.

Each nominator is asked by the federal Minister of Justice to submit a list of names from whom an appointment to the relevant committee can be made. The Minister, with the assistance of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs Canada, then selects persons to serve on each committee who reflect factors appropriate to the jurisdiction, including geography, gender, language and multiculturalism. Committee members are appointed by the Minister of Justice to serve a three-year term, with the possibility of a single renewal.

The Minister meets periodically with the Chairs of all the committees for an exchange of views concerning the operation of the process.

Administrative support for the work of the committees, including information sessions and guidelines concerning confidentiality and other committee procedures, is provided by the Judicial Appointments Secretariat of the Office of the Commissioner.

All committee proceedings and consultations take place on a confidential basis.

For more information visit http://www.fja-cmf.gc.ca/appointments-nominations/committees-comites/index-eng.html.

 

Black Female Lawyer’s Network 10th Annual Sistahs-in-Law Retreat & Fundraiser - November 11, 2016

10th Annual Sistahs-in-Law Retreat & Fundraiser

Black Female Lawyers Network

Friday, 11 November 2016 from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM (EST)

Toronto, ON

This year the 10th Annual Sistah's-In-Law Retreat and Fundraiser will be on Friday, November 11, 2016, from 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., and held at the historic Assembly Hall, City of Toronto, 1 Colonel Samuel Smith Park Drive, Toronto.

The 2016 Retreat "Re-imagining the Complexion of Success" continues the tradition of providing insight, inspiration and affirmation to black professional women. Featuring professionally accredited panels; special guests and our celebrated Caribbean lunch, the Sistahs-in-Law Retreat is a must-attend for those in the know!

Inclusive in every ticket:

Panel and workshop
Special Guest Keynote featuring Justice Corrine E. Sparks

Caribbean lunch

2016 CPD accreditation will be announced shortly. 

In 2015 this program was eligible for up to 2.5 Professionalism Hours and 2.5 Substantive Hours.

CDP Logo

Using Your Skill-set to Give Back - by The Honourable Sandra Chapnik

Recently retired from the Superior Court of Justice, the Honourable Sandra Chapnik shares her volunteer philosophy in an article from the July 16, 2016 Toronto Star.

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Judicial Vacancy Ontario Court of Justice - Thunder Bay - by Friday, March 18, 2016

JUDICIAL VACANCY
ONTARIO COURT OF JUSTICE
THUNDER BAY
BILINGUAL POSITION

The Judicial Appointments Advisory Committee advises the Attorney General of Ontario on the appointment of Judges to the Ontario Court of Justice, and invites applications for a bilingual judicial position in Thunder Bay.

This appointment involves presiding over criminal and family law matters (approximately 50% criminal and 50% family) and also involves travel within the regional boundaries as assigned by the Regional Senior Justice and/or the Chief Justice.

The minimum requirement to apply to be a Judge in the Ontario Court of Justice is ten years completed membership as a barrister and solicitor at the Bar of one of the Provinces or Territories of Canada.

All candidates must apply either by submitting 14 copies of the current (February 2016) completed Judicial Candidate Information Form in the first instance or by a short letter (14 copies) if the current form has been submitted within the previous 12 months. Should you wish to change any information in your application, you must send in 14 copies of a fully revised Judicial Candidate Information Form.

If you wish to apply and need a current Judicial Candidate Information Form, or if you would like further information, please contact:

Judicial Appointments Advisory Committee
Tel: (416) 326-4060 Fax: (416) 212-7316
Website: www.ontariocourts.ca/ocj/jaac/

All applications, either sent by courier, mail or hand delivery, must be sent to:

Judicial Appointments Advisory Committee
c/o Ministry of Government Services Mail Delivery
77 Wellesley Street West, Room M2B-88
Macdonald Block, Queen’s Park
Toronto, Ontario, M7A 1N3

Applications must be on the current prescribed form and must be TYPEWRITTEN or COMPUTER GENERATED and RECEIVED BY 4:30 p.m. on Friday, March 18, 2016.

CANDIDATES ARE REQUIRED TO PROVIDE 14 COPIES OF THEIR APPLICATION FORM OR LETTER.
A Fax copy will be accepted only if 14 copies of the application or letter are sent concurrently by overnight courier. Applications received after this date WILL NOT be considered.

The Judiciary of the Ontario Court of Justice should reasonably reflect the diversity of the population it serves. Applications from members of equality-seeking groups are encouraged.

POSTE À POURVOIR AU SEIN DE LA MAGISTRATURE
COUR DE JUSTICE DE L’ONTARIO
THUNDER BAY
POSTE BILINGUE

Le Comité consultatif sur les nominations à la magistrature conseille le Procureur général de l’Ontario sur les nominations de juges à la Cour de justice de l’Ontario et invite les personnes intéressées à présenter leur demande au poste de juge bilingue à Thunder Bay.

Cette nomination comprend la présidence d’affaires de droit criminel et de droit de la famille (environ 50 % droit criminel et 50 % droit de la famille) et nécessite également des déplacements à l’intérieur des limites régionales, selon les assignations du juge principal régional ou du juge en chef.

Pour pouvoir poser sa candidature à un poste de juge à la Cour de justice de l’Ontario, il faut, comme condition minimale, avoir été inscrit comme avocat-plaidant et procureur au barreau de l’une des provinces ou de l’un des territoires du Canada pendant au moins dix ans.

Tous les candidats et candidates doivent poser leur candidature soit, dans le premier cas, en présentant le Formulaire de renseignements sur le candidat/la candidate à la magistrature courant (février 2016), soit en envoyant une courte lettre (en 14 exemplaires) si le formulaire courant a été présenté au cours des 12 mois précédents. En cas de changements à apporter à un formulaire déjà envoyé, le candidat ou la candidate doit envoyer à nouveau 14 exemplaires du formulaire de renseignements corrigé.

Si vous voulez poser votre candidature et que vous avez besoin d’un Formulaire de renseignements sur le candidat/la candidate à la magistrature courant, ou encore si vous souhaitez obtenir de plus amples renseignements, veuillez communiquer avec :

Comité consultatif sur les nominations à la magistrature
Téléphone : (416) 326-4060
Télécopieur : (416) 212-7316
Site Web : www.ontariocourts.ca/ocj/fr/jaac/

Toutes les demandes envoyées par service de messagerie, par la poste ou en main propre doivent être soumises à l’adresse suivante :

Comité consultatif sur les nominations à la magistrature
a/s Ministère des Services gouvernementaux - Services de distribution du courrier 77, rue Wellesley Ouest, salle M2B-88
Édifice Macdonald, Queen’s Park
Toronto (Ontario) M7A 1N3

Les demandes de candidature doivent être déposées par l’entremise du formulaire prescrit courant et DACTYLOGRAPHIÉES ou CRÉÉES PAR ORDINATEUR et reçues au plus tard à 16 h 30 le vendredi 18 mars 2016.

LES CANDIDATS ET CANDIDATES DOIVENT FOURNIR 14 EXEMPLAIRES DE LEUR FORMULAIRE OU DE LEUR LETTRE DE CANDIDATURE. Une télécopie ne sera acceptée que si 14 exemplaires du formulaire ou de la lettre de candidature sont également envoyés par service de messagerie de 24 heures. On n’accordera AUCUNE considération aux candidatures reçues après cette date.

La magistrature provinciale doit refléter raisonnablement la diversité de la population qu’elle sert. Nous encourageons les membres de groupes de promotion de l’égalité à présenter une demande.

Law student’s article spotlights human rights issue impeding entry to profession

Article taken from Queen's Legal News Bulletin Maria Nunez, Queen's University Law ’16

Maria Nunez, Law’16, an advocate for persons with disabilities, is now a published author on the topic. Her paper about the impact of the law school admissions process on these individuals appears in the 2015 Canadian Legal Education Annual Review (CLEAR).

In her article, “The Law School Admission Council, the Law School Admission Test, and Barriers for Individuals with Disabilities. Oh My! Leaving the Legal Profession Before Admission?,” she argues that the current LSAT accommodation process discriminates towards persons with disabilities, raising a human rights concern and creating barriers for entry into the legal profession.

“The status quo is that students with disabilities are still not being properly accommodated,” says Nunez. “It remains to be seen what procedural protections will be put in place to ensure that admissions procedures for students with disabilities are equitable.”

Before coming to law school, Nunez worked as an aid for youth and adults with disabilities, and volunteered with various community organizations in Calgary. “Advocating for persons with disabilities is a cause close to my heart,” she says. “I wanted to raise awareness about the fact that many students are deterred from applying to law school because they do not receive adequate disability accommodations for the LSAT, despite ample medical documentation. A strong case exists for systemic discrimination.”

Nunez wrote the paper as part of an independent study project supervised by Professor Beverley Baines, Law’73, who encouraged Nunez to write on a topic that she was passionate about. “It is a very well researched, significant contribution to the issues raised,” says Baines. “I think people in the legal world, including those in all Canadian law schools, need to read it.”

While publishing a paper in law school was not always a goal of hers, Nunez is proud that her article can educate people about some of the contemporary barriers that persons with disabilities encounter when pursuing law school. “Whatever I do in the future, I hope that I will make a positive mark and help people.”

In a separate email to WLAO, Nunez wrote: I feel "The paper is very important and relevant for the Canadian law profession. For those unfamiliar with the topic, in 2012, the United States Justice Department brought an action against the Law School Admission Council (LSAC), alleging “widespread and systemic deficiencies in the way it processes requests by people with disabilities for testing accommodations.” In 2014, a settlement agreement was reached requiring LSAC to reform its accommodation practices and to pay $7.73 million in penalties and damages. I write about how similar concerns still affect access to legal education in Canada and I offer recommendations for how LSAC and law schools can better address the needs of Canadians with disabilities."

Step into Fall with Erin Nadler of Better Styled

Looking to do a little fall wardrobe update? Before you rush out to buy this seasons trends think about the versatility of each piece you purchase. Make sure each new item you add can go with multiple pieces that already exist in your closet. At Better Styled we help clients curate wardrobes that mix and match easily and can take you from day to night. Looking for some ideas to get you fall ready? Here is a taste of the kinds of tips and tricks we at Better Styled offer our clients.

Trends for Fall 2015

  • Details, details, everywhere: From zipper details on dresses, jackets, and coats, to the return of bold plaid and textured fabrics, the runways were full of exciting details. In addition bold colour blocking, prints, and lace are everywhere.

Office appropriate idea: Try a fabulous long satin blouse which can be layered under your suit or worn with a pencil skirt Monday to Friday, but also looks fabulous with a wrap coat and skinny jeans on the weekend.

  • Bad to the bone: Leather, leather and more leather. Look out for leather jackets, leather skirts, and leather trim detailing this season.

Office appropriate idea: Try this trend in a leather trimmed black skirt, an easy way to change up your classic black skirt and still be office ready.

  • Black is king: No surprise that black is back for fall but in addition to the classic black other colours like hues of grey, cobalt blue, navy, winter white, and shades of red are everywhere.

Office appropriate idea: Pop your favorite black outfit with a stunning coloured wrap coat? This item can be worn as both an indoor and outdoor coat. Do not be afraid to use some of these bold tones this season to freshen up last fall’s dark colours.

Day to Night Dressing ideas

  • Plan ahead: last minute events or drink meetings always come up but thinking ahead and having a few go-to outfits each year in your closet will save you a lot of time and stress.
  • Re-purpose items you already own: Take your LBD’s (little black dresses), crisp white blouses, favourite black trouser and add a sequined top, oversized statement necklace, fabulous shawl, or simply a change of shoe to take your office look to a night out on the town.
  • Add a little bling: the easiest way to take your look from day to night is to add a little sparkle. Your basic black sheath dress worn with a blazer overtop for day can easily be transformed by losing the blazer and adding a detailed belt, drop chandelier earrings and/or a fabulous pashmina for the evening.

Want more information or to have a consultation? Email erin@betterstyled.com

Mail

Women’s Law Association of Ontario
1 Toronto Street, Suite 900
Toronto, ON M5C 2V6

Phone

416-410-7267

toll free: 1-888-723-8883

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